incidentalcomics:

The Shape of Ideas

(via ladybar)

mollitudo:

Also featuring: Jamaica Kincaid, Faith Adiele, Gloria Anzaldúa, Richard Rodriguez, Susan Sontag, David Shipler, María Cristina Rangel, and, naturally, “It’s Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers.”

mollitudo:

Also featuring: Jamaica Kincaid, Faith Adiele, Gloria Anzaldúa, Richard Rodriguez, Susan Sontag, David Shipler, María Cristina Rangel, and, naturally, “It’s Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers.”

“ Get someone else to read your story to you. Many say read your work out loud and this does help but I believe you still hear in your head what you wanted to write. When someone else reads it you stop hearing what you wanted to say and hear exactly what you’ve written. ”
PHOTO
todaysdocument:

August 14 is National Navajo Code Talkers Day:
riversidearchives:

Recruiting the first 29.

“We hope and have every reason to believe, that the Navajos will play a major role in Marine Corps operations. When the war is over, their story may rank with great sagas of the battlefield.”

August 14, is National Navajo Code Talkers Day, proclaimed in 1982 by President Ronald Reagan for just that reason. The Code Talker story is an incredible war saga. The code developed by these men was never broken by the Japanese, and it was said, at the time, that without them, the Marines would have never taken Iwo Jima.
Records about the Navajo Code Talkers can be found throughout the National Archives:  in the U.S. Marine Corps records in College Park, in the Military Personnel Records in St. Louis, and in the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Riverside and Washington, D.C.  This topic is one of many which allow researchers to explore the National Archives!

Read more at: Prologue: Pieces of History » Unbreakable: Remembering the Code Talkers

todaysdocument:

August 14 is National Navajo Code Talkers Day:

riversidearchives:

Recruiting the first 29.

“We hope and have every reason to believe, that the Navajos will play a major role in Marine Corps operations. When the war is over, their story may rank with great sagas of the battlefield.”

August 14, is National Navajo Code Talkers Day, proclaimed in 1982 by President Ronald Reagan for just that reason. The Code Talker story is an incredible war saga. The code developed by these men was never broken by the Japanese, and it was said, at the time, that without them, the Marines would have never taken Iwo Jima.

Records about the Navajo Code Talkers can be found throughout the National Archives:  in the U.S. Marine Corps records in College Park, in the Military Personnel Records in St. Louis, and in the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Riverside and Washington, D.C.  This topic is one of many which allow researchers to explore the National Archives!

Read more at: Prologue: Pieces of History » Unbreakable: Remembering the Code Talkers

(via smithsonianlibraries)

“ Read as much as you can. Nothing will help you as much as reading. ”
“ As we manipulate everyday words, we forget that they are fragments of ancient and eternal stories, that we are building our houses with broken pieces of sculptures and ruined statues of gods. ”
— Bruno Schulz (via kalliope-amorphous)

(via buffleheadcabin)

wordishness:

New research shows that taking notes by hand instead of by computer greatly increases retention of concepts.

The picture above is basically what my undergraduate classes looked like. Oh, well. At least they’re using Macs.

wordishness:

New research shows that taking notes by hand instead of by computer greatly increases retention of concepts.

The picture above is basically what my undergraduate classes looked like. Oh, well. At least they’re using Macs.

PHOTO
redcloud:

winawinadajcie:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though
why was there temporary internet
with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!
In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).
In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.


Cool!

Cornish game hen uses Clumsy. It was not very effective.

redcloud:

winawinadajcie:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though

why was there temporary internet

with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!

In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).

In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.

Cool!

Cornish game hen uses Clumsy. It was not very effective.

(Source: neilcicierega)

“ Autocorrection is no longer an overqualified intern drawing up lists of directives; it’s now a vast statistical affair in which petabytes of public words are examined to decide when a usage is popular enough to become a probabilistically savvy replacement. ”
“ The highest reward for a person’s toil is not what they get for it, but what they become by it. ”
— John Ruskin (via chaos-mikka)

(via buffleheadcabin)

“ Education either functions as an instrument which is used to facilitate integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity or it becomes the practice of freedom, the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world. ”
botpoet:

"Not until a machine can write a sonnet or compose a concerto because of thoughts and emotions felt, and not by the chance fall of symbols, could we agree that machine equals brain - that is, not only write it but know that it had written it."
- Geoffrey Jefferson, The Mind of the Mechanical Man, 1949

botpoet:

"Not until a machine can write a sonnet or compose a concerto because of thoughts and emotions felt, and not by the chance fall of symbols, could we agree that machine equals brain - that is, not only write it but know that it had written it."

- Geoffrey Jefferson, The Mind of the Mechanical Man, 1949