botpoet:

"Not until a machine can write a sonnet or compose a concerto because of thoughts and emotions felt, and not by the chance fall of symbols, could we agree that machine equals brain - that is, not only write it but know that it had written it."
- Geoffrey Jefferson, The Mind of the Mechanical Man, 1949

botpoet:

"Not until a machine can write a sonnet or compose a concerto because of thoughts and emotions felt, and not by the chance fall of symbols, could we agree that machine equals brain - that is, not only write it but know that it had written it."

- Geoffrey Jefferson, The Mind of the Mechanical Man, 1949

Email Submission Now Closed

The Writing Center’s Email Essay Review Service is now closed for Summer ‘14. We will begin accepting submissions again the second week of classes this fall semester.

Enjoy your break!

VIDEO

(via beefranck)

“ Reading is the quiet time in which you reflect and learn, it is not a race. It is where you teach yourself that which you don’t know—it is your time with some of the smartest (or at least different) people who’ve ever lived. This is not something to be rushed through, but enjoyed, savored and done deliberately. In fact, smart readers do more than just comprehend words. They ask questions, they take notes, they look things up, they make connections, they produce marginalia. People who read a lot of books spend a lot of time reading. There’s no way around this. ”

charliebink:

Hey everyone,

For the last year of my life I’ve been working my butt off on this game - Trekking the National Parks. I designed it, created all the art, and now I’m self publishing it. So the time has finally come to launch on Kickstarter!

Besides being an independent artist, I’m also an avid gamer. My goal was to make something fun and easy to learn that families and friends could enjoy together.

So if you are a fan of games, National Parks, or even just my art, please help me out by pledging to this project! You can also help by simply reblogging this post. Thanks.

putthison:

One of the wisest guys I know is Andrew WK. I first met him as a guest on my show something like fifteen years ago now, when his first album had just come out. A few years later, he gave my brother, a musician, a special backstage tour of his bus and guitars - my brother was eight then, and is in college now, still making music. Andrew always asks after him by name. I’ve spoken with Andrew regularly if infrequently over the years, and it’s always a pleasure. He’s all about partying - but that means something more to him than it might mean to you.
He writes an advice column for the Village Voice, and he recently took on the question of what it takes to be a man. I thought his answer was a beautiful counterpoint to the idea that the way to be a man is to have the right multi-tool or know how to chop wood or know how to bare-knuckle box or whatever.
Here’s what Andrew recommends:
To be a real human being, you must try…
To care about someone and something more than yourself.
To accept help from someone even when you believe you don’t need anyone.
To cheer people up and bring them simple joy in times when it seems hardest to smile.
To bring loving comfort and sincere hugs in the midst of violence, pain, and suffering.
To recognize your own shortcomings and failings before lashing out at another’s weakness.
To have true compassion when someone’s in a bad mood, with the understanding that they might be going through a hardship you’re not aware of.
To constantly remember that life is a fragile and precious miracle which requires all our collective effort to protect.
To humbly work to improve our own defects and cut everyone else a little more slack.
To remember that being a loving and positive person isn’t always easy, but it’s always worth it.
And lastly, to never give up on the power of humanity and on your own potential to be a caring, loving person.
The whole piece is absolutely worth reading, as is the totality of the series.

putthison:

One of the wisest guys I know is Andrew WK. I first met him as a guest on my show something like fifteen years ago now, when his first album had just come out. A few years later, he gave my brother, a musician, a special backstage tour of his bus and guitars - my brother was eight then, and is in college now, still making music. Andrew always asks after him by name. I’ve spoken with Andrew regularly if infrequently over the years, and it’s always a pleasure. He’s all about partying - but that means something more to him than it might mean to you.

He writes an advice column for the Village Voice, and he recently took on the question of what it takes to be a man. I thought his answer was a beautiful counterpoint to the idea that the way to be a man is to have the right multi-tool or know how to chop wood or know how to bare-knuckle box or whatever.

Here’s what Andrew recommends:

To be a real human being, you must try…

  1. To care about someone and something more than yourself.
  2. To accept help from someone even when you believe you don’t need anyone.
  3. To cheer people up and bring them simple joy in times when it seems hardest to smile.
  4. To bring loving comfort and sincere hugs in the midst of violence, pain, and suffering.
  5. To recognize your own shortcomings and failings before lashing out at another’s weakness.
  6. To have true compassion when someone’s in a bad mood, with the understanding that they might be going through a hardship you’re not aware of.
  7. To constantly remember that life is a fragile and precious miracle which requires all our collective effort to protect.
  8. To humbly work to improve our own defects and cut everyone else a little more slack.
  9. To remember that being a loving and positive person isn’t always easy, but it’s always worth it.
  10. And lastly, to never give up on the power of humanity and on your own potential to be a caring, loving person.

The whole piece is absolutely worth reading, as is the totality of the series.

PHOTO

An edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end. (via The Frankenfont project reconstructs Mary Shelley’s classic Frankenstein using parts of incomplete fonts found in PDFs from the internet. | Fathom)
An edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end. (via The Frankenfont project reconstructs Mary Shelley’s classic Frankenstein using parts of incomplete fonts found in PDFs from the internet. | Fathom)

(via treets)

"If you love visual comedy, you gotta love Edgar Wright, one of the few filmmakers who is consistently finding humor through framing, camera movement, editing, goofy sound effects and music. This is an analysis and an appreciation of a director so awesome that Marvel had to fire him on a holiday."
via Tony Zhou

(Source: vimeo.com)

“ College in today’s economy is like sunscreen on a scorchingly hot afternoon: You have to see the people who didn’t apply it to fully appreciate how important it is. The same way a blistering sun both makes sunscreen feel ineffective and makes it more crucial than ever, recessions can both make a college degree seem ineffective and make it more important than ever. ”
PHOTO
jeanralphiovaljean:

seraphknights:

jessica what the hell does this mean

okay this is important information. the nail-painting emoji (“paint my damn nails”, or pmdn, as it is known) represents an attitude of earned self-satisfaction or self-confidence. one might use it after posting a good selfie or winning an argument. it says “i’m the best, so just paint my damn nails”.
this post compares the original ios pmdn to pale, non-apple imitators which cannot convey the same message. this implies that the “me” in the post truly possesses and is justified in the pmdn attitude, while others can only hopelessly try to imitate the aesthetic

jeanralphiovaljean:

seraphknights:

jessica what the hell does this mean

okay this is important information. the nail-painting emoji (“paint my damn nails”, or pmdn, as it is known) represents an attitude of earned self-satisfaction or self-confidence. one might use it after posting a good selfie or winning an argument. it says “i’m the best, so just paint my damn nails”.

this post compares the original ios pmdn to pale, non-apple imitators which cannot convey the same message. this implies that the “me” in the post truly possesses and is justified in the pmdn attitude, while others can only hopelessly try to imitate the aesthetic

(Source: tkyle, via tyleroakley)

“ It’s in the nature of web pages and other digital documents that they are fleeting; the original version of the Cern website was never saved, just updated and overwritten as time went on. As a result, Boulton writes, “whilst 48 copies of the Gutenberg bible are known to exist, printed over 500 years ago, no evidence of the first web page survives, not even a screenshot.” ”
“ Unfortunately, the way computer science is currently taught in high school tends to throw students into the programming deep end, reinforcing the notion that code is just for coders, not artists or doctors or librarians. But there is good news: Researchers have been experimenting with new ways of teaching computer science, with intriguing results. For one thing, they’ve seen that leading with computational thinking instead of code itself, and helping students imagine how being computer savvy could help them in any career, boosts the number of girls and kids of color taking—and sticking with—computer science. Upending our notions of what it means to interface with computers could help democratize the biggest engine of wealth since the Industrial Revolution. ”