“ Writing a first draft and reminding myself that I’m simply shoveling sand into a box so that later I can build castles. ”
— Shannon Hale

(Source: writingbox)

theparisreview:

The art of brand names: what makes for assonant, beautiful, memorable, popular branding? (Pro tip: do not name your company Shpoonkle. It will fail.)
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

The art of brand names: what makes for assonant, beautiful, memorable, popular branding? (Pro tip: do not name your company Shpoonkle. It will fail.)

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

(Source: brooklynmutt)

“ Sometimes when I’m stuck, I’ll open an English textbook, and do the homework. There are a lot of college writing textbooks that will include essays and short stories, and after reading the story or essay, there will be questions such as "Have YOU had any experience with a pedophile in YOUR family?" or "When was the last time you saw YOUR mother drunk?" and they’re just really good at prompting stories. ”
— David Sedaris had a characteristically funny Reddit AMA yesterday. Here are the highlights: http://bit.ly/1o1X6dz

(Source: wnyc)

“ The curse of knowledge is the single best explanation of why good people write bad prose. It simply doesn’t occur to the writer that her readers don’t know what she knows—that they haven’t mastered the argot of her guild, can’t divine the missing steps that seem too obvious to mention, have no way to visualize a scene that to her is as clear as day. And so the writer doesn’t bother to explain the jargon, or spell out the logic, or supply the necessary detail. ”
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newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by Benjamin Schwartz.

newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by Benjamin Schwartz.

(Source: newyorker.com)

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durgapolashi:

Toni & Fran

durgapolashi:

Toni & Fran

“ Call it the Curse of Knowledge: a difficulty in imagining what it is like for someone else not to know something that you know. The term was invented by economists to help explain why people are not as shrewd in bargaining as they could be when they possess information that their opposite number does not. Psychologists sometimes call it mindblindness. In the textbook experiment, a child comes into the lab, opens an M&M box and is surprised to find pencils in it. Not only does the child think that another child entering the lab will somehow know it contains pencils, but the child will say that he himself knew it contained pencils all along! The curse of knowledge is the single best explanation of why good people write bad prose. It simply doesn’t occur to the writer that her readers don’t know what she knows—that they haven’t mastered the argot of her guild, can’t divine the missing steps that seem too obvious to mention, have no way to visualize a scene that to her is as clear as day. And so the writer doesn’t bother to explain the jargon, or spell out the logic, or supply the necessary detail. ”

ASU Day @ SCC This Wednesday

Students who are planning to attend ASU, or have questions about ASU are encouraged to attend ASU Day in the Student Center on Wednesday, October 1 from 10:00AM to 1:00PM. Each academic unit will be represented along with select student service departments. It will be an enjoyable event complete with music, snacks and more.

emersunn:

This nicely captures the otherworldly-ness of AZ weather.

(Source: vimeo.com)

smartasshat:

I’mma let you finish but Sairam Gudiseva had one of the best RickRolls of all time. One of the best RickRolls of all time!

smartasshat:

I’mma let you finish but Sairam Gudiseva had one of the best RickRolls of all time. One of the best RickRolls of all time!

(via apricotica)

theatlantic:

To Remember A Lecture Better, Take Notes By Hand

Psych 101 was about to start, and Pam Mueller had forgotten her laptop at home. This meant more than lost Facebook time. A psychology grad student at Princeton, Mueller was one of the class teaching assistants. It was important she have good notes on the lecture. Normally she used her laptop to take notes, but, without it, she’d have to rely on a more traditional approach. 
So she put pen to paper—and found something surprising. 
Class just seemed better. “I felt like I had gotten so much more out of the lecture that day,” she said. So she shared the story with Daniel Oppenheimer, the professor teaching the class.
“‘I had a similar experience in a faculty meeting the other day,’” Mueller remembers him saying. “And we both sort of had that intuition that there might be something different about writing stuff down.”
It turns out there is.
Read more. [Image: Renato Ganoza]

theatlantic:

To Remember A Lecture Better, Take Notes By Hand

Psych 101 was about to start, and Pam Mueller had forgotten her laptop at home. This meant more than lost Facebook time. A psychology grad student at Princeton, Mueller was one of the class teaching assistants. It was important she have good notes on the lecture. Normally she used her laptop to take notes, but, without it, she’d have to rely on a more traditional approach. 

So she put pen to paper—and found something surprising. 

Class just seemed better. “I felt like I had gotten so much more out of the lecture that day,” she said. So she shared the story with Daniel Oppenheimer, the professor teaching the class.

“‘I had a similar experience in a faculty meeting the other day,’” Mueller remembers him saying. “And we both sort of had that intuition that there might be something different about writing stuff down.”

It turns out there is.

Read more. [Image: Renato Ganoza]